Bypass Repeated Content

Unesco World Heritage Site

Maulbronn Monastery

Aerial view of Maulbronn Monastery with eastern courtyard. Image: Staatliche Schlösser und Gärten Baden-Württemberg, Achim Mende
MONASTIC POWER AND ROYAL REPRESENTATION

THE EAST COURTYARD

The eastern courtyard behind the hermitage is characterized by two impressive structures: the hunting lodge from the time of Württemberg's dukes and the Ephorat. Behind this, the large Ephorat garden stretches out, boasting presbytery ruins and the Faust tower in the southeastern corner.

Ephorat at Maulbronn Monastery. Image: Staatliche Schlösser und Gärten Baden-Württemberg, Steffen Hauswirth

The Ephorat.

FROM HOSPITAL TO SCHOOL: THE EPHORAT

Before its conversion into a guest house and infirmary, this structure was the monastery hospital. Monks could access it from the hermitage through the connecting corridor with the late Gothic net vault. The building was modified several times but is Romanesque at its core. The last structural changes were commissioned by Abbott Entenfuß in 1512, with the addition of the oriel. Its name reflects its current use as an evangelical seminary, whose headmaster is referred to as an Ephorus.

View from the belfry to the hunting lodge at Maulbronn Monastery. Image: Staatliche Schlösser und Gärten Baden-Württemberg, Arnim Weischer

The hunting lodge.

A HUNTING LODGE AS ROYAL REPRESENTATION

The year of its construction is inscribed above the main entrance: 1588. The territorial ruler, Duke Ludwig I von Württemberg, built his hunting lodge over the old cellar vaults of a previous structure, which most likely served as the abbot's house. The prestigious structure, with a characteristic round tower on either side and stone cross windows, was the administrative building for the Maulbronn district in the 19th century. Today, it too is used by the evangelical seminary.

Ruins of the presbytery at Maulbronn Monastery. Image: Staatliche Schlösser und Gärten Baden-Württemberg, Arnim Weischer

Presbytery ruins.

IMPRESSIVE WALL REMNANTS: THE PRESBYTERY

Prebendaries were members of public office who had bought into the monastery and subsequently received care in old age. They resided in the presbytery, which also served as a nursing facility. The Maulbronn poorhouse was also housed here in the 19th century. Today, remnants of a wall indicate what an imposing medieval structure the presbytery was. The building was constructed in 1430, was 30 meters long and was originally three stories high. A fire in 1892 reduced the presbytery to ruins.